Is omeprazole addictive

Is omeprazole addictive?

Is Omeprazole addictive?

Contents of the post

  • Indications
  • Examples of PPI’s (Proton Pump Inhibitors)
  • Purpose of recommending or prescribing or consuming omeprazole or any other PPI
  • Is omeprazole and other PPI’s addictive in nature?
    • For those who have to take this medicine for a long time
    • For those who don’t have to take this medicine for a long time
  • Does PPI’s have a potential for drug abuse?
  • What if someone has abused and consumed an overdose of PPI’s?
  • Withdrawal symptoms of Omeprazole
  • How to take Omeprazole and other PPI’s safely without experiencing any side effects?

Some basic information before I begin to answer the above question

Indications

In the treatment of

  • Duodenal ulcers
  • Gastric ulcers
  • GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disease)
  • Erosive esophagitis
  • Pathological hypersecretory conditions

**## Please note: All the above-mentioned conditions are the ones in which there is an increased secretion of gastric acid, leading to acidity or heartburn as the primary symptom.

Examples of PPI’s (Proton Pump Inhibitors)

Please note that the above-mentioned names are generic names of the drugs or molecules and not the brand names or trade names.

Purpose of recommending or prescribing or consuming Omeprazole or any other PPI (Proton pump Inhibitors)

  • All the above-mentioned diseases or pathological conditions are the ones in which there is an increased secretion of gastric acid.
  • This increased gastric acid leads to acidity or heartburn, which is also the primary symptom of the above-mentioned conditions.
  • Omeprazole and other PPI’s (Proton Pump Inhibitors) are employed to reduce the amount of acid secreted in the stomach, in order to relieve acidity or heartburn.

Coming to the big question: Is omeprazole and other PPI’s addictive in nature?

  • Well, if you are looking for a specific answer in just one word, it’s a ‘Yes’. Omeprazole and other PPI’s are addictive in nature. But don’t jump to any conclusion. There are many more IF’s and BUT’s to this ‘YES’. Let me explain to you.
    • The treatment of all the conditions mentioned above lasts long; like 4 to 8 weeks.
    • If we consider the science of “habit formation’, anything that we do for 21 days, it becomes a habit.
    • Also, when you do something and if the reward is positive, you are more likely to repeat that thing and relish the positive reward.
    • This repetition of events to reach that state of satiety or happiness leads to the formation of habit and later forms an addiction.
    • In the case of the above mentioned pathological conditions, the reward is a relief from hyperacidity or heartburn.
    • Rather than using the term addictive, the term dependent or dependency is more suitable in this case. This is because a person is really and truly dependent on PPI’s (Proton Pump Inhibitors) like omeprazole, Rabeprazole, esomeprazole, and others to get relief from hyperacidity or heartburn.
    • The explanation mentioned above applies only to those who are suffering from pathological conditions like gastric ulcers, duodenal ulcers, GERD or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, pathological hypersecretory conditions and erosive esophagitis.

Then what about those who are not suffering from the above mentioned pathological conditions?

  • Those individuals, who are not suffering from any of the pathological conditions which increase the secretion of gastric acid, are less likely to get dependent on omeprazole and other PPI’s.
  • This is because these people are not going to take PPI’s for a long time.
  • Taking these PPI’s occasionally or once in a while will not make them dependent on omeprazole.
  • This is because for these individuals, the reward of relief from hyperacidity or heartburn though positive is not a necessity on a daily basis.
  • Finally to answer the question, taking PPI’s occasionally will not make them an addict or PPI-dependent.

Does PPI’s have a potential for drug abuse?

  • Anything which can cause an addiction or dependency has the potential for abusive usage.
  • But if you are relating the abusive usage of narcotic substances like opioids to the usage of PPI’s; such abusive use is not possible.
  • This is because narcotic substances cross the blood-brain barrier and affect a person’s mind or thinking:
    • By creating hallucination
      • In this case, a person lives in his or her own imaginary world and is unwilling to come out of that world.
    • By creating euphoria
      • In this case, a person feels extremely happy. He or she also experiences an intense feeling of well-being.
    • By reducing the anxiety
  • All the above-mentioned effects that a person experiences with the use of narcotic substances are not possible with PPI’s.
  • Hence, a person is extremely less likely (almost impossible) to abuse PPI’s.

What if someone has abused and consumed an overdose of PPI’s?

  • No specific antidote is known.
  • Dialysis does not aid in excess drug removal as Rabeprazole is extensively protein bound.
  • Supportive treatment should be given as and when required.
  • Contact the emergency department of your local hospital in cases of overdose or suspected overdose.
  • No specific antidote is known.
  • Dialysis does not aid in excess drug removal as Pantoprazole is extensively protein bound.
  • Supportive treatment should be given as and when required.
  • Contact the emergency department of your local hospital in cases of overdose or suspected overdose.
  • Confusion, drowsiness, blurred vision, tachycardia, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, flushing, headache and dry mouth are some of the symptoms of overdose.
  • No specific antidote is known.
  • Dialysis does not aid in excess drug removal as Omeprazole is extensively protein bound.
  • Supportive treatment should be given as and when required.
  • Contact the emergency department of your local hospital in cases of overdose or suspected overdose.
  • No specific antidote is known.
  • Dialysis does not aid in excess drug removal as Lansoprazole is extensively protein bound.
  • Supportive treatment should be given as and when required.
  • Contact the emergency department of your local hospital in cases of overdose or suspected overdose.
  • Symptoms of overdose include reduced motor activity, tremor, ataxia, reduced respiratory frequency and intermittent clonic convulsions.
  • Confusion, drowsiness, dry mouth, blurred vision, nausea, tachycardia, headache, flushing, and diaphoresis were also reported.
  • No specific antidote is known.
  • Dialysis does not aid in excess drug removal as Rabeprazole is extensively protein bound.
  • Supportive treatment should be given as and when required.
  • Contact the emergency department of your local hospital in cases of overdose or suspected overdose.
  • Severe hypertension has been reported for 60 mg twice a day dose of Dexlansoprazole.
    • Consult your doctor as soon as possible.
  • Symptoms of overdose include reduced motor activity, tremor, ataxia, reduced respiratory frequency and intermittent clonic convulsions.
  • Confusion, oropharyngeal pain, and weight loss were also reported.
  • No specific antidote is known.
  • Dialysis does not aid in excess drug removal as Dexlansoprazole is extensively protein bound.
  • Supportive treatment should be given as and when required.
  • Contact the emergency department of your local hospital in cases of overdose or suspected overdose.

Withdrawal symptoms of omeprazole

  • Common withdrawal symptoms
    • Heartburn
    • Indigestion or Dyspepsia
    • Acid regurgitation
  • Other withdrawal symptoms
    • Appetite loss
    • Anxiety
    • Bloating
    • Depression
    • Constipation
    • Diarrhea
    • Fatigue
    • Dizziness
    • Lightheadedness
    • Insomnia
    • Gas
    • Headache
    • Stomach ache
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting

How to take Omeprazole and other PPI’s safely without experiencing any side effects or dependency?

  • In order to take Omeprazole and other medicines safely, follow the instructions of the prescribing doctor as well as the pharmacist.
  • Note down the details on when and how to take the medicines.
  • Also, note down the details if any on discontinuing the use of these medicines.

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By |2018-08-30T11:03:34+00:00August 28th, 2018|Myth busters|0 Comments

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